Cinema Theatre

10/12/1963

Location: Cinema Theatre
1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

Curator: John Fles

Description:
On Saturday, October 12, at Midnight, the Cinema Theater inaugurates an endless series of Saturday midnight screenings. The three films shown on the 1st nite- Jack Smith's FLAMING CREATURES, Stanley Brakhage's DOG STAR MAN, PART 1 and Gregory Markopoulos' TWICE A MAN.. .really represent the latest, greatest in N.A.C. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1963]

Films Screened:

11/09/1963

Location: Cinema Theatre
1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

Curator: John Fles

Description:
At Land: Secret and personal drama, explores that ambiguities of imaginative and objective reality. A poetic self-revelation by the leading avant-garde pioneer. (Cinema 16) Les Enfants Terribles: Produced and Directed by Jean-Pierre Melville. From the novel by Jean Cocteau, dialog and narration also by him. The private world of a brother and sister who share one room, it's secrets, treasures, memories and cluttered appurtenances. Isolated by circumstances, the brother and sister create a world of their own. Jean Cocteau died on October 13th. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1963]

Films Screened:

11/17/1963

Location: Cinema Theatre
1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

Curator: John Fles

Description:

Films Screened:

12/21/1963

Location: Cinema Theatre
1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

Curator: John Fles

Description:
Warner Brothers invested 1,500,000 in a gigantic talented cast, two top name directors, and a Russian Ballet Company in one of the first authentic efforts to produce a film virgin of a Shakespearean drama. Plus... SCOTCH TAPE by Jack Smith. Looking for love in a N.J. junkyard? We'll dance naked to Carmen Miranda, just us boys together, remembering mama and having a whale of a time behind on out -of-focus flower. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1963]

Films Screened:

12/28/1963

Location: Cinema Theatre

Curator: John Fles

Description:
Plus...A Los Angeles premiere of an important short film by a film maker whose initials are S.B. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes,1963]

Films Screened:

1/4/1964

Location: Cinema Theatre

Curator: John Fles

Description:
The famous rocket ship hurtle through the stratosphere at bullet speed on its thrilling trip to Mars! Queer, spectacular, mechanical and electrical inventions! Escape through the ring of fire! The amazing stratos led and the nitron loaded plane crash in mid-air! The radio-active light ray gun! The magic powers of black and white sapphires! The vacuum tube subway! Weird laboratories, torture chambers, whole cities that stagger the imagination! Red blooded youth against monsters of science shielding the world from dreadful doom. In deadly battle with demon creatures of weird sky regions. Plus... Jack Smith and the "Flaming Creatures" in the west coast premiere of CHUMLUM, by Ron Rice maker of "Flower Thief" and "Senseless." Luxurious can-you-top-this in multiple exposure by one of the most vigorous leaders of the New American Cinema. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1964]

Films Screened:

  • Flash Gordon in Rocket Ship
  • Chumlum (1964) Ron Rice(16mm, Color, Sound, 00:26:00)

2/1/1964-2/2/1964

Location: Cinema Theatre

Curator: John Fles

Description:
VAMPYR is one of the few serious and really brilliant filmic creations of the macabre. It set a patten for literally dozens of "horror" films to follow, but still stands unequalled in artistic achievement. Carl Dreyer has used the principle that horror cannot be shown for a sustained period, but is more effective if the situations, atmosphere and ideas are implanted in the audience's mind, for them to create their own horror in their own imagination. SCOTCH HOP, an amusing film by Christopher MacClaine, described by Stan Brakhage as "utterly beyond my description, being of the area of deceptively simply pure film movement... the droning beauty of the bagpipes finds its perfect visual correspondence in his slow motion dance shots, and his jump cuts visually fulfill the grace note activity so wondrously peculiar to anyone who has attempted to play a chanter pipe, or, that is, really listened to one. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1964]

Films Screened:

  • Vampyr
  • The Creeping Shadow Chapter 3
  • Scotch Hop

2/8/1964-2/9/1964

Location: Cinema Theatre
1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

Curator: John Fles

Description:
The exotic queen of mythical Egyptian empire seeks her father's assassin- loses her throne and is a helped to regain it by the slave whom she had previously suspected. Technicolor enriches the beautiful regal and period settings. Read Jack Smith's Maria Montez articles in Film Culture to get the full low-down on this wonderful woman. The Man Who Invented Gold, a film by Christopher MacClaine described by Stan Brakhage as "a film fable so structured that all alchemical searchings are clearly filmwise (gold being discovered cinematically in each sequence of mixed black and white and color) so that when the drama-discovery is actually made, it acts as a deliberate, anti-climax of aesthetic perfection. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Noates, 1964]

Films Screened:

2nd L.A. Filmmaker's Festival
2/12/1964

Location: Cinema Theatre
1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

Curator: John Fles

Description:

Films Screened:

    2/15/1964-2/16/1964

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:
    Jean-Isidore Isou is a member of a small and somewhat unusual group known as "Letterists." In this film, which he refers to as a 'revolt against the cinema', he has attempted to discuss what is wrong with the cinema today (almost everything according to him) and then goes on to show examples of what he thinks the cinema should consist. These examples include such selections as poems "constructed for the pure beauty of their noise," and abstracts made by tearing and scratching the film. Whether or not the film represents artistic expression will have to be the individual decision of the viewer. In the words of Jean Cocteau, "Is VENOM a springboard or is it a void? In fifty years we'll know the answer. After all, remember how Wagner was received. Today no one objects to his outbursts. The day will come, perhaps, when Isou's style will be the fashion. Who can tell? Stan Brakhage, one of the judges for the L.A. Film-Makers Festival will lecture and screen latest films at Valley State and U.C.L.A. These Films, which include work-in-progress, will be shown tonight, along with "Venom and Eternity"- with brief intro's by the film-maker. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1964]

    Films Screened:

    • Venom and Eternity
    • The Creeping Shadow Chapter 5

    2/22/1964-2/23/1964

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:
    THE END, an experimental film unique in its liberal inter-cutting of color and black-and-white sequences and in the employment by its poet-maker of sections containing sound only to deliver what he feels to be an important message. In form the film consists of five episodes dealing with five different people, each seen on the last day of his existence. These episodes are linked by sound only sections, and the whole is capped by a lyric coda. Produced by Christioher MacClaine, photographed by Jordan Belson. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1964]

    Films Screened:

    2/29/1964-3/1/1964

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:
    The Creeping Shadow Chapter 7/ "One of the weirdest sci-fi parodies, parodies iteself finally leaving the whole Trak audience in convulsions." -J. Fles [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1964]

    Films Screened:

    3/7/1964

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:

    Films Screened:

    3/14/1964

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:
    Erich von Stroheim's GREED. This films is the monumental effort of one man- Erich von Stroheim. Frank Norris' turn-of-the-century novel of greed and murder, McTEAGUE, was based on a famous crime, and Stroheim wrote, directed and filmed it page by page, scene by scene, it its actual locales: the slums of San Francisco and Death Valley. (He even rented the house where the murder had been committed.) There is, doubtless, a certain naivete in a filmmaker who burns with a passion to be faithful to his original down to the last comma; but Stroheim's tenacity, his refusal to compromise, and his ultimate martyrdom, are unique in American film annals. Working from his own script at a time when most directors shot 'off the cuff,' Stroheim rehearsed and shot each scene again and again until he achieved the affect he wanted. The result was an almost semi-documentary film of moral degeneration through lust for gold. Geoffery T. Gledhill at the Organ [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1963]

    Films Screened:

    3/21/1964

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:

    Films Screened:

    3/21/1964

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:

    Films Screened:

    Special Easter Show
    3/28/1964-3/29/1964

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:
    The Passion of Joan of Arc. This is, for us, the greatest film ever made. The script is based on the trial records; Carl Dreyer has taken this testimony and made it appear to be spoken for the first time. As five grueling interrogations follow one another, Dreyer turns the camera on the faces of Joan and her persecutors, and in giant close-ups, he reveals his interpretation of their emotions. In this enlargement, Joan and the inquisitors are shockingly fleshy- isolated with their sweat, warts, spittle, tears, and (as no one in the film used make=up) with contours, features and skins that are individual. To prepare for the part, Falconetti (she was 50 and a well known stage comedienne) spent a year in a convent. There is no question that Dreyer subjected her to absolutely pitiless rehearsals, and no actress has ever labored under a scrutiny so intense: for most of the film, the camera hung like a giant eye only a few feet from her face. Dreyer used white backgrounds- nothing distracts the viewer from the physiognomy of the actress. The merest incomprehension of her role, the slightest false note, would have been amplified a hundred-fold. And Falconetti's extraordinary acting was done for a medium that requires innumerable interruptions for camera set-ups, and caused one great stage actor to exclaim in despair that film acting was like practicing coitus interruptus- whenever you got really excited, you had to stop... After completing THE PASSION, Falconetti returned to the stage and never made another film. People seeing it for the first time may feel, as we did, anger and a sense of claustrophobia: what right had any director to subject an audience to such an ordeal?! With subsequent viewings this sense of outrage fades- for the film does not. The more often one sees it, the more expressive the actors' mute gestures become; one learns to interpret them, as one learns a new language - by entering more fully into its context. And yet, as with only the highest works of art, the more deeply you penetrate into THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC, the clearer it becomes that the work is inexhaustible. The supporting roles are also beyond the ravages of time: Sylvain is a chilling Cauchon; as Massieu, young Antonin Artaud is the image of passionate idealism. 1928 The Fight Game, by Bill Powers. Boxers in training; machines in operation. A comparison of motions, movements, and more. 'One of the best films on boxing ever made.' (Jonas Mekas) [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1964]

    Films Screened:

    1/21/1965

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:

    Films Screened:

    The Acid Test
    2/25/1966

    Location: Cinema Theatre
    1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

    Curator: John Fles

    Description:

    Films Screened:

      Journey to the Center of the Midnight Cornucopia
      11/4/1967

      Location: Cinema Theatre
      1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

      Curator: Mike Getz

      Description:

      Films Screened:

      Erotithon
      11/18/1967

      Location: Cinema Theatre
      1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

      Curator: Mike Getz

      Description:
      Overflow by Carl Linder "A mock heroic film. It overindulges the lyric until the saturation point is reached, until the vocalist is shot out of the sky. With howitzers and sonic booms, and ended by a nubile child's accusing smile."- C.L 'Erotithon' Tonight we present a completely unique film program, which when presented several months ago in San Francisco received tremendous unprecedented audience acclaim. All we can tell you is that it is the definitive sensational work done on previews of coming attractions. It promises to be a wild, overwhelming experience, a hilarious insight into the male psyche. [Source: Movies 'Round Midnight Program Notes, 1967]

      Films Screened:

      Jump For Good Old Erotic Joy
      12/2/1967

      Location: Cinema Theatre
      1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

      Curator: Mike Getz

      Description:

      Films Screened:

      Movies for the Aggressive Man and his Woman!
      12/9/1967

      Location: Cinema Theatre
      1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

      Curator: Mike Getz

      Description:
      (It's time you showed her where it's at) WORMWOOD STAR by Curtis Harington (in color), Cameron, Artist-alchemist whose work leads to the transmutation of immortality. And what it does for her you never quite understand. IS by Ira Schneider (in color), Hang on as you ride the ice cream cone of every day events which are what is. BRIDGES-GO-ROUND by Shirley Clarke, Swirling testament to man's bedazzlement with his constructive potential. CHAIRY TALE by Norman McLaren (Music by Ravi Shankar) A profound confrontation between man and chair. PESTILENT CITY by Peter Goldman, Who are these strange creatures? Where do they all come from? [Source, Movies Round Midnight Program Notes, 1967]

      Films Screened:

      NO UOY NRUT OT EVOL D'I
      12/16/1967

      Location: Cinema Theatre
      1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

      Curator: Mike Getz

      Description:

      Films Screened:

      Come Wild Laughter in the Midnight Hour
      12/23/1967

      Location: Cinema Theatre
      1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

      Curator: Mike Getz

      Description:

      Films Screened:

      7/16/1971

      Location: Cinema Theatre
      1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

      Description:

      Films Screened:

      8/7/1971

      Location: Cinema Theatre
      1122 N. Western Ave. Los Angeles

      Description:

      Films Screened: